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British 3D App Game Features Forgotten Black History

Black history in cyberspace

“This fun and dynamic app comes in a number of variants with specialist themes, that we believe to be a world first in game apps,” Beula said.

The first variant of the game app is the African-American edition. Beula plans subsequent release of other international culturally relevant editions.

The Nubian Jak board game also had various editions. The original board game highlighted the positive role models of African Heritage in Britain and Europe. A February 2009 special limited U.S. edition of the Jak board game commemorated the election of Barack Obama, who made history as the first black elected to America’s highest office.

The Nubian Jak game app requires players -- individual and/or multiple -- to move around eight space platforms, while trying to avoid being “Jakked up,” “Hijakked,” or “Blocked” by opposing players.

In addition to navigating around the space platforms, there are multiple-choice questions that pop up frequently, requiring players to answer before they can progress. Questions come in categories rangeing from art, government, science, sports to stage. Answering correctly will propel a player forward, while an incorrect answer may find players “Chilling Out” for a couple of rounds.

“Much time was spent on usability. This is manifested in the audio/spoken help system/tutorial,” app developer Aubrey Murray said. “I believe we have a duty to our kids to keep our history alive and accessible to the youngsters.”

The Nubian Jak 3D app is available for Apple and Android devices. Americans can purchase this game app that engages skill, strategy and general knowledge of African-American history through iTunes and Google Play.

Beula, a singer-songwriter/social worker who lives in London, is applauded widely across Britain for his initiatives to preserve and project Britain’s often overlooked Black History through the placing of plaques honoring persons and places.

Nubian Jak plaque for Frederick Douglass in London's exclusive Chelsea section. LBWPhotoNubian Jak plaque for Frederick Douglass in London's exclusive Chelsea section. LBWPhoto
 

Those 30-plus blue plaques include recognition of Blacks that impacted Britain who lived in the United States.

Those blacks include the well-known Malcolm X and Frederick Douglass and a pivotal activist little known in contemporary America despite her varied activities drawing the ire of US authorities. Claudia Jones, exiled from America in 1955 for her anti-racist activism, founded an influential newspaper in London and laid the foundation for that city’s world famous annual Caribbean Carnival.



story | by Dr. Radut