Skip to Content

Bigot Boy Trump Bombs With Tweet Against Black NFL Players

Trump runs but can't hide

Trump has cited preservation of election integrity in America as his rationale to back various Republican voter suppression initiatives specifically devised to limit voting rights of Americans perceived to support the Democratic Party, particular blacks.

Trump is quick to declare, ad nauseam, that he’s done nothing wrong and he’s engaged in “no collusion” with Russia or Russians. Trump’s duplicitous denials of curious connections with Russia/Russians have a hollow ring similar to his repeated assertion that he is not a “racist person” despite persistent bigoted blather against Latinos and blacks.

Trump’s badgering black football players about insulting the military and American ideals when they peacefully knell in protest during the national anthem is farcical.

If standing with hand-on-heart during the playing of the national anthem is so sacred, why does Trump not demand either cessation of selling beer and other items during the anthem or require those in concessions line to stand with hand-on-heart?

If Trump feels all players must stand for the anthem why does he not compel fans at stadiums sitting on toilets at that time of the anthem to stand also?

The Trump that demands allegiance to the anthem is the President that dismisses the very issue at the heart of the player’s protest: police brutality. Trump barred his Justice Department from oversight of abusive police departments across America, a policy that aids-&-abets the police brutality that NFL players seek to stop with their protests.

The institutional racism that underlies both abusive policing and many Trump Administration practices is a scourge that has devastated African-Americans for over a century. Asserting that African-Americans are unpatriotic (particularly when they protest race prejudice) is a recurring element of that scourge.

President Trump’s tarring of black NFL players as unpatriotic for staging anti-injustice protests during the national anthem is a tactic castigated over a century ago in a book written by the first black to play in Major League Baseball – Moses Fleetwood Walker.

Walker, a University of Michigan graduate, made is mark on baseball in May 1884 when he played his first MLB game – five years before MLB officially banned black players in 1889.

“The Negro has often been credited with possessing a strong patriotism; yet the treatment given him at the hands of his fellow citizens is designed ultimately to make an enemy of government,” Walker wrote in his 1908 book, “Our Home Colony.”

As Walker noted in his book, “Persecution never rendered a people patriotic.”

Over sixty years after Walker made his historic mark the fabled Jackie Robinson broke the ban on blacks the MLB had erected. Robinson, like Walker, endured despicable discrimination from fellow players, fans and wider society. The racism Robinson endured on and off the field led him to reject blind allegiance to the national anthem.

Robinson, in his 1972 autobiography, wrote, “I cannot stand and sing the anthem. I cannot salute the flag; I know that I am a black man in a white world…I know that I never had it made.”

The accomplishments of Robinson and Walker are memorialized in the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Smithsonian facility located not far from the White House in Washington, DC.



story | by Dr. Radut