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However Tenuous and Whatever His Motives, Trump's Summit Agreement with Kim is Praiseworthy

One cheer for Trump

Surely this was not the intention of President Trump in meeting with Kim, but let him have his moment. Because he desperately needed something positive in the foreign affairs realm to show for his now bumptious, goof-ball 18-month-old presidency, he had to reach an agreement of some kind with North Korea, and now he’s gotten that. The agreement is going to turn out well, too, even if not the way he’d have intended. If President Moon now nominates him and Kim for the Nobel Peace Prize, as he has suggested, they’ll deserve it at least as much as war criminal Henry Kissinger (awarded the prize in 1973 jointly with his North Vietnamese counterpart Le Duc Tho who unlike Kissinger at least had the decency to decline it) and Israel’s Menachim Begin and Egypt’s Anwar Sadat — and surely far more than his predecessor Barack Obama, who proceeded, upon collecting his medal, to ramp up the Afghanistan War yet again, to invade Libya, overthrowing the government there, to meddle in Syria and threaten that country with a missile blitz, and to launch more deadly drone and Special Forces targeted murder attacks against people in numerous sovereign nations than the Bush/Cheney administration ever did.

Corporate Democrats like ex-VP and likely future presidential candidate Joe Biden and Sen. Diane Feinstein, along with hardline neo-conservatives like Sen. John McCain and Bolton are ranting that Trump has sold out US imperial interests. They clearly prefer an eternal state of war between the US and South Korea, since it’s good for the US war machine and for the arms industry that feeds off it. But that endless war policy, whether in Europe, Asia or the Middle East, hasn’t been good for anyone else, abroad or here at home in the US.

In a good indication of what I'm talking about here, major arms makers' shares fell on news of the Trump-Kim agreement even as the broader Dow Jones and Standard & Poor indexes rose on the news. As financial analyst Brad McMillan of Commonwealth Financial Network put it in an interview in USA Today yesterday, investors’ see the chance of war between the U.S. and North Korea—which he describes as “one of the big potential growth stories recently” -- now disappearing. As he explained it, “If weapons are used they need to be replaced. That makes war a growth story for these stocks.“What the agreement [between Trump and Kim] does, at least for a while, is take military conflict off the table.”

Here’s hoping Trump manages to keep his radical right-wing advisors like Bolton from blowing up the deal he’s struck with Kim, and that Moon succeeds in signing a real peace treaty with his northern neighbor that can eventually lead to the reunification of the Korean people, as happened in the early 1990s Germany and after the defeat of the US military in Vietnam in the 1970s.



story | by Dr. Radut