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Why did Edward Snowden go to Hong Kong?

A whistleblower holding all the cards

 

A lot of people in the US media are asking why America's most famous whistleblower, 29-year old Edward Snowden, hied himself off to the city state of Hong Kong, a wholly owned subsidiary of the People's Republic of China, to seek at least temporary refuge.

Hong Kong has an extradition treaty with the US, they say. And as for China, which controls the international affairs of its Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, while granting it local autonomy to govern its domestic affairs, its leaders "may not want to irritate the US" at a time when the Chinese economy is stumbling.

These people don't have much understanding of either Hong Kong or of China.

As someone who has spent almost seven years in China and Hong Kong, let me offer my thoughts about why Snowden, obviously a very savvy guy despite his lack of a college education, went where he did.

Hong Kong civil liberties and human rights activists and organizations are already working to build support for Snowden, demandiHong Kong civil liberties and human rights activists and organizations are already working to build support for Snowden, demanding that he be protected from US prosecution for his whistleblowing. They are starting with a march and rally set for Saturday -- putting Hong Kong citizens out ahead of Snowden's own compatriots in the US when it comes to standing up against the NSA's Stasi-like tactics.

 

First of all, forget about Hong Kong's extradition treaty. When it comes to deciding whether someone will be extradited, particularly for a political crime, as opposed to a simple murder or bank heist, the decision will be made in Beijing, not in a Hong Kong courtroom. Second, Hong Kong has a long history of providing a haven to dissidents -- even to dissidents wanted by the Chinese government. Consider, for example, the Chinese labor movement activist Han Dongfang, who was the subject of a massive dragnet after the Tiananmen protests, but who successfully fled to Hong Kong before the handover of the place from Britain to China, and is continuing to monitor Chinese labor strife and protest from his home on Hong Kong's Lamma Island. Hong Kong also has a public that is very supportive of democratic values -- certainly more so than the majority of American citizens. Hong Kong people may not be paying too much attention to Snowden's situation right now, but if the US were to actively seek to extradite him, I am confident that the place would erupt in support for him, including the local media.



story | by Dr. Radut