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New Video of Crime Scene Found: US Supreme Court Confirms 3rd Circuit Ruling Lifting Mumia Abu-Jamal’s Death Penalty

As my colleague Linn Washington and I prove convincingly in a gun test we ran last year (see the film of our test by scanning down to the bottom of our homepage or go to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hedfNPt6UQQ&feature=player_embedded), this story had to have been a fabrication, because three of those shots missed Faulkner, and there is no sign of bullet impacts anywhere in the concrete sidewalk around the bloodstained spot where Faulkner’s body was lying. That lack of evidence would raise questions about whether the prime witness describing that certainly brutal slaying story could actually have seen what he told the jury he saw.

The witness in question, a young white taxi driver named Robert Chobert, claimed at the trial that he had parked his taxi directly behind Faulkner’s parked squad car. The shooting was said to have occurred on the sidewalk two cars forward of Chobert’s taxi, meaning he would have been viewing it diagonally from his seat at the wheel, through at least the front and rear windows of the parked squad car and perhaps the parked VW Beetle belonging to Abu-Jamal’s brother Billie Cook, too -- this at night and with Faulkner’s dome lights and tail lights flashing in his eyes. But on top of this, there is no crime-scene photo showing Chobert’s taxi cab parked behind Faulkner at all, and the likelihood is that he was not even a witness.

Update:Archival news footage of a local TV station was recently discovered which had been made of the Locust Street scene of the Faulkner shooting, showing police in the dark early morning hours of Dec. 9, 1981 putting barriers in place around the crime scene. Faulkner's squad car is plainly seen, as is Billy Cook's VW ahead of it, and a Ford sedan ahead of that, but there is no sign of Chobert's taxi, which should be in the foreground parked behind Faulkner's vehicle. A still from that video segment is posted above

It would also certainly be presented by the defense at any penalty hearing that contrary to the trial prosecutor’s assertion to the jury that “this man” (Chobert) had “no reason to lie,” he actually had plenty of reason to do so. The original jury, thanks to a biased and clearly ludicrous decision by the trial judge, Albert Sabo, never was informed that Chobert at the time he allegedly parked behind Faulkner’s vehicle, and at the time of the trial, was driving on a driver's and a hack's license suspended for a DWI conviction, and that he was on probation for felony arson, for the fire-bombing of an elementary school! Furthermore, it only became known to the defense in 1995 that Chobert had also asked the prosecutor if he might be able to “fix” his driver’s license problem (a request that the prosecutor should by law have immediately made known to the defense, and to the court, since even if he did nothing to help Chobert, it meant that Chobert was likely to have been hoping for a reward for testifying favorably for the prosecution).

Of course, this is only one example of the peril posed to the state’s case against Abu-Jamal by any public rehearing on his death penalty. There are many, many more such perils, too.



story | by Dr. Radut