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New Video of Crime Scene Found: US Supreme Court Confirms 3rd Circuit Ruling Lifting Mumia Abu-Jamal’s Death Penalty

Maureen Faulkner, the widow of Daniel Faulkner, who has been a tireless campaigner for Abu-Jamal’s execution, has reportedly told a reporter from the Associated Press, following word of the Supreme Court’s decision, that she “wondered whether it was time to end the long-running drama.” She is quoted as saying she worries about the cost of a rehearing of the penalty issue to the city of Philadelphia, and notes that “many of the relevant witnesses are dead.” Plus she doesn’t want to afford Abu-Jamal any more publicity, she says.

What she doesn’t say, but what DA Williams surely knows, is that if there were a re-hearing of the penalty phase of this sorry case, there is virtually no way that a modern Philadelphia jury would vote to execute Abu-Jamal. First of all, it would not be possible for the DA, who in any case is himself an African-American for the first time in the city’s history, to pack the jury with white people the way the prosecutor did in 1982 (and the way the DA’s office routinely did in felony and especially murder trials until 1986, when the despicable practice, tantamount to lynching, was outlawed by the Supreme Court). Furthermore, Abu-Jamal has been a model prisoner for 30 years, earning a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree while on death row, writing a number of highly-regarded books, including Live from Death Row, which exposes the horrors of a life waiting for death, and of the nation’s whole prison industrial complex. And of course, he has served those 30 long years in prison, and still faces a future of life without possibility of parole even if he doesn’t face execution. That is bound to seem punishment enough to at least one juror in a panel of 12 honestly selected individuals of the city of Philadelphia, making a unanimous death penalty sentence almost impossible to imagine.

But there is another reason I seriously doubt Williams will retry Abu-Jamal to get the death penalty reimposed: the fear that such a court hearing could lead to a new trial on the conviction itself, which was the result of a trial process which was even more of a travesty, if that is possible, than the portion that led to his death penalty.

This is because in a penalty-phase hearing, in order to refute prosecution claims to a jury that Abu-Jamal didn’t just kill Officer Faulkner, but killed him in a way that was wanton and deliberate and even pre-meditated, Abu-Jamal’s defense attorneys would certainly bring in witnesses, some from the original trial, and some discovered since that trial, who would raise serious questions about the veracity of the original trial’s prosecution witnesses. They could do this because those witnesses were used at the trial to describe not just the supposed shooting, but the vicious manner in which it was supposedly carried out.

Just take the matter of the prosecution’s depiction, in closing arguments during the penalty phase of the trial, of an “execution-style” slaying of Faulkner, with witnesses describing Abu-Jamal standing astride the prone Faulkner, who was supposedly lying “on his back,” and firing four shots downward almost point blank, hitting the officer once between the eyes.



story | by Dr. Radut