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Bradley Manning and the Secret World

Poor Bradley Manning. The kid can’t catch a break. Not only does the military have him locked in some inhuman solitary hole where they can slow-torture him using the latest approved methods, now his troubled private life is being broadcast for all to see.

After running 75,000 secret military field reports released by WIkiLeaks, The New York Times assigned a reporter, Ginger Thompson, to find out personal details about PFC Manning, who is being held at the Marine base at Quantico, Virginia.

What she found was a sensitive, smart kid who did his best to survive the mess he landed in when he was born. A dysfunctional family life seems to have pushed him into the loner category. Then, as kids are encouraged to do by recruitment posters, he chose to join the Army, as Thompson writes, “to give his life some direction.”

Nothing out of the ordinary, here. A recruiter realizes the kid is quite smart, maybe a bit nerdy, but he’s a wiz with computers. As a former employer told Thompson, Manning was blessed with “an almost innate sense for programming.”

But then the Times reveals that Manning is homosexual, which means, because the military’s absurd “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy is finally being discussed in an adult fashion, the Manning story is a potential bomb in that discussion.

The formation of a loner

Smart yet unable to fit in and the subject of ridicule for being gay everywhere he went, Manning became a loner with a keen sense of survival. He also exhibited a temper, or as the ex-boss who fired him put it, he had “the personality of a bull in a China shop.” Thompson reports he “assaulted an officer” in Iraq.

A friend from Manning’s early childhood in Oklahoma told the British Daily Mail Manning identified as gay at age 13. Then, he's off to live with his mother in her native Wales, and a friend in the high school there describes the anti-gay taunting as “like going back in time to the Dark Ages.”

Tyler Watkins, left, and Bradley ManningTyler Watkins, left, and Bradley Manning

Daniel and Patricia EllsbergDaniel and Patricia Ellsberg

Next, Manning is ping-ponged back to Oklahoma to live with his father, who had a career in the military. When his father learns his son is gay, he throws him out of the house. Manning ends up living in his car.

It is, here, he joins the United States Army and is accepted as an analyst in its intelligence branch with a top-secret clearance. No recruiter would likely have confused him for a macho, knife-in-the-teeth killer. He's the classic nerdy kid with great computer skills, a character type even General Stanley McChrystal recognizes, in his famous Rolling Stone interview, as highly valuable to the military.



story | by Dr. Radut